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Democrats were puffing hot air and criticized the Trump administration because they feared his declassification plan would uncover their dirty deeds, according to Fox News contributor Jason Chaffetz.

When “Fox & Friends” co-host Jedediah Bila asked Chaffetz about Democrats’ concerns that President Trump’s plans would hurt national security Saturday, the former chairman of the House Oversight Committee responded that it was “hogwash.”

Trump’s plan, Chaffetz argued, would improve Attorney General William Barr’s ability to communicate with intelligence agencies.

“First of all, the attorney general has every security clearance that he could possibly have, the Federal Bureau of Investigations has a counterintelligence component.”

He speculated that Democrats were projecting their own fears about the declassification uncovering troubling activities on their part.

BRENNAN, CLAPPER LASH OUT AT TRUMP FOR DECLASSIFYING 2016 ELECTION INTEL

“I think it’s projection by the Democrats that they’re scared to death that the highest echelons within some of these agencies — specifically [former CIA Director John] Brennan and [former Director of National Intelligence James] Clapper and perhaps [former national security advisor Susan] Rice and some of these other people along the way were doing some things that they shouldn’t have been doing,” Chaffetz said.

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Chaffetz was commenting on Trump’s decision to give the attorney general greater authority in investigating the origins of the Russia investigation.

Chaffetz, on Saturday, suggested that instead of getting criticism, the president should be receiving awards for his efforts at transparency.

Source: Fox News Politics

There is an old expression in Washington that nothing is decided until everything is decided.

Well, consider the state of the $19.1 billion disaster bill.

It took a Herculean effort to pry that package loose Thursday in the Senate, triggering an overwhelming, 85-8 vote. President Trump signaled to Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Richard Shelby, R-Ala., and Sen. David Perdue, R-Ga., that he would sign the package – even without provisions for the border. The senators say the President indicated the disaster money was too important and had been stalled too long. States in the south and Midwest – stricken by hurricanes and flooding – could wait no longer.

That’s until Rep. Chip Roy, R-Texas, torpedoed everything Friday morning.

There are three ways the House and Senate can approve bills. They can conduct a standard roll call vote, where everyone either casts ballots as yea or nay. The House and Senate can hold a “voice vote.” That’s where everyone either hollers yea or nay. The loudest side is supposed to win.

However, the lawmaker who is presiding always declares “in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it” or “the noes have it.” But, if the losing side doesn’t like the outcome, they can always demand a recorded vote. Finally, there is “unanimous consent.” That’s where all 435 or 100 people must agree. All it takes is a solitary objection, even if everyone else wants to do something else. Lodging an objection stops everything.

LONE GOP REP BLOCKS DISASTER AID BILL IN SURPRISE MOVE

It is said you can make the sun rise in the west if you obtain unanimous consent.

This is where Roy comes in.

There were only three House members on the floor Friday when the House tried to advance the disaster aid measure by unanimous consent and sync up with the Senate. Rep. Jim McGovern, D-Mass., presided over the session. Rep. Donna Shalala, D-Fla., was on the floor to make the unanimous consent request. And then there was Roy.

Those in favor of the measure outnumbered Roy two one.

Unanimous consent is powerful – but hard to obtain. There’s only one reason Roy showed up Friday morning as the House attempted to approve the measure with a skeleton staff on hand. Passing the package by unanimous consent would mean the House and Senate were in alignment, having okayed the same package. The measure would then be ready for President Trump’s signature.

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., implored Democratic leaders to keep the House in session on Thursday to approve the disaster aid measure. But the House wasn’t going to budge until the Senate acted. Most House members jetted out of Washington midday Thursday for a week-and-a-half, starting the Memorial Day recess.

It was unclear until early Thursday afternoon as to the fate of the disaster package. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., warned his colleagues the Senate would vote “on something” on disaster aid and “not adjourn.” The Senate pondered re-voting a sidetracked version of disaster aid which fell apart in early April. But the Senate was set to vote on a retooled plan once President Trump signaled he would sign the measure – even without the border provisions. Things came together very quickly in the Senate. But the House was long gone.

One may ask whether it would have been worthwhile to keep the House in session just to see if the Senate would act. Of course, there’s always grandstanding from lawmakers about such efforts. Lawmakers regularly trumpet why Congress should remain in session over a recess or a weekend to try to fix one issue or another. Those are often the same lawmakers who have a cab idling just outside the Capitol, ready to whisk them across the river to make a flight at Reagan National Airport.

The Memorial Day recess is particularly problematic for scheduling. Many members have big overseas work trips planned. A number of lawmakers are expected to go to Normandy, France in a few days for the 75th anniversary of D-Day. That’s to say nothing of lawmakers who are jetting back to their states and districts to participate in Memorial Day parades and visit cemeteries.

Tethering lawmakers to Washington for a day or two, without a clear idea that a consequential vote is coming presents a problem. Yes, the Senate approved the disaster bill just after the House abandoned Washington. But it was far from clear that senators would do that Thursday.

So, the disaster measure is now stalled. Again.

Roy chatted briefly with Shalala on the House floor just before the session started Friday morning.

“He came up to graciously inform me he was going to object because he wanted the President’s border request to be included,” said Shalala. “This is not the way our government should work. We’re ready to work in the House in a bipartisan way. The same as the Senate was ready to go. One individual. His position is irresponsible.”

Shalala characterized the turn of events as “tragic.” She worried about the additional delay for families trying to recover.

“Why should they have to wait a week longer because some member of Congress objects?” asked the Florida Democrat.

Of course, the question is whether Roy simply delayed the inevitable. But the House won’t return to full action until June 4. The House appears to have the votes to pass the plan in bipartisan fashion.

“This, is respectfully, swamp-speak. Delaying the inevitable. It’s the inevitability of DC. The inevitability of spending where we don’t speak up and voice the concerns that I hear when I go back to every town in Texas 21,” said Roy. “Why aren’t we addressing disaster spending in a way that is fiscally responsible? We just keep writing checks.”

Roy got an earful from Florida Agriculture Commissioner Nikki Fried.

“It’s craven, shameful politics at its worst that a single House member would choose to further delay disaster relief,” protested Fried. “Congressman Roy must have forgotten the aid that Texans received after hurricane Harvey.”

But is passage of the bill inevitable? Simply delayed?

SENATE PASSES DISASTER AID BILL 

It is said that house guests and fish start to smell after three days. Consider the controversy which stymied this disaster package. Republicans tried to infuse the bill with presidential politics. They argued Senate Democrats running for President should vote yes – or face trouble in sodden Iowa ahead of the caucuses. Republicans contended Democrats played politics with Puerto Rico money. There were questions about what a stunted disaster bill would mean for Sens. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, Ben Sasse, R-Neb., John Cornyn, R-Texas, and Perdue. All face re-election bids in states desperate for disaster assistance. All could face competitive races. Ernst is in a battleground state. Texas and Georgia are trending slightly toward Democrats. Then there were issues about adding humanitarian provisions for the border. Are things settled with this legislation? Or, will another impediment possibly expose the bill to political enzymes, ready to foul the legislation?

“I am not looking for a way to erode support for something,” said Roy when asked about letting the legislation bake in the parliamentary elements for more than a week. “This legislation should be offset. This legislation should include border funding so we can deal with that crisis.”

But the bill may not have to wait a week.

Only a few House members will linger around Washington for the next 11 days. The House is scheduled to meet briefly at 2 pm on Tuesday, May 28 and at 4:30 pm on Thursday, May 30. House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., intimated that “we will take action as early as next week when the House meets again during pro forma.”

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That’s a reference to those short sessions. The House could again attempt to marshal unanimous consent to pass the disaster aid bill without a roll call vote. This is a ploy by Democrats to dare Roy or other Republicans to object again. Then Democrats can portray them as obstructionists who are trying to delay disaster assistance.

This could all backfire on Roy and other GOPers. If they don’t object, then the bill passes and the protestations fall by the wayside. If they do block the bill a second or a third time, then Democrats can easily make the case about Republican obstructionism.

Not a lot of people knew who Chip Roy was before today. But now they do. Democrats will pin a name and a face on the obstruction.

Then again, one senior Republican source told Fox “perhaps Roy wants it that way.”

Source: Fox News Politics

Former CIA Director John Brennan and former DNI James Clapper blasted President Trump on Friday night for directing Attorney General William Barr to declassify documents related to the surveillance of his campaign during the 2016 election, calling it “outrageous.”

“I see it as a very, very serious and outrageous move on the part of Mr. Trump, once again, trampling on the statutory authorities of the Director of National Intelligence and the heads of the independent intelligence agencies,” Brennan told MSNBC host Chris Hayes. “And it’s unclear to me what Mr. Barr is actually going to do. Is he investigating a crime? Well, what’s the predication of that crime? Or he is just going to be looking for information… that Mr. Trump can just give to his defenders on the right and cherry-pick information that could be taken out of context?”

TRUMP VOWS TO UNCOVER RUSSIA PROBE ROOTS WITH DECLASSIFICATION CALL: ‘WE’RE EXPOSING EVERYTHING’

Brennan expressed concern about exposing “sources and methods” as well as the intelligence of “partners abroad.”

“This is very serious and I know that my former colleagues in the intelligence agencies are looking upon this with great concern and worry,” the former top Obama official stated.

He later said he hopes that DNI Dan Coats and CIA Director Gina Haspel will “stand up” to President Trump’s “unprecedented act.”

Brennan slammed President Trump on Twitter after the president shared a political cartoon mocking the former CIA Director, former DNI Clapper, and FBI Director James Comey.

TRUMP GIVES AG BARR AUTHORITY TO DECLASSIFY DOCUMENTS RELATED TO 2016 CAMPAIGN SURVEILLANCE

“Young people everywhere: Please do not emulate Mr. Trump’s very immature behavior. Find others of honesty, integrity, & decency to be your role models,” the MSNBC analyst tweeted. “And always try to do what you know is the right thing, even when doing what is right is both unpopular & difficult.”

Meanwhile, Clapper told CNN’s Anderson Cooper that the “bigger issue” is “what exactly is the scope” of the declassification, whether it involves all of Russia’s interference in the election or just the counter-intelligence probe. He expressed similar concerns as Brennan regarding sources and methods being exposed and putting “people’s lives at risk.”

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Clapper, now a CNN analyst, insisted that the infamous Steele dossier was not used as sourcing for the intelligence community assessment in January 2017.

Source: Fox News Politics

Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg is blasting President Donald Trump for “chest-thumping militarism” and warned that rising tensions between the U.S. and Iran “could very quickly get away from this president.”

At a campaign event Friday night in the first-in-the-nation primary state of New Hampshire, the one-time long shot for the nomination — who has surged the past two months to become a credible contender — also vowed that “I’m going to win” as he took an indirect jab at former Vice President Joe Biden, the clear front-runner in the Democratic 2020 race.

TRUMP SENDS 1,500 TROOPS TO MIDDLE EAST AMID RISING TENSIONS WITH IRAN

The South Bend, Indiana mayor and Afghanistan War veteran criticized the Republican president just hours after the Pentagon said that 1,500 additional U.S. forces and firepower are headed to the Middle East as the specter of potential conflict with Tehran increases.

The Trump administration has been ringing alarms the past month over what it calls “troubling” and “escalatory” moves by Iran. The U.S. has been raising the volume on Iran ever since the president took the country out of a multilateral nuclear deal with Iran a year ago.

Trump has spent weeks alternating between tough talk towards Tehran while still insisting he’s open to negotiating with the Islamic Republican. On Friday, the president told reporters before departing on a trip to Japan that “we’re going to be sending a relatively small number of troops, mostly protective.”

Buttigieg, speaking at a campaign event in Exeter, New Hampshire, claimed that Trump “now seems to be setting us on a course that could lead to violent confrontation.”

He later told reporters that “I’m very worried because we have steps towards confrontation in Iran that almost make it seem as though we learned nothing from the experience in Iraq.”

And he warned that “what we’re seeing right now is a set of escalations that could very quickly get away from this president to where he’s not even in control.”

JUDGE TEMPORARILY BLOCKS TRUMP’S BORDER WALL CONSTRUCTION PLANS

For the third time in two days, Buttigieg took aim at Trump accusing him of faking a disability decades ago in order to avoid military service in the Vietnam War.

Speaking to a crowd jam-packed into Exeter’s historic town hall that his campaign estimated at 680 people, the candidate charged Trump “used his privilege to avoid serving when it was his turn.”

He made similar comments at a campaign event with veterans in Londonderry, New Hampshire earlier in the evening.

Trump received five deferments from the draft for military service during the Vietnam War. Four were education deferments while he was a college student and the fifth – in 1968 after he graduated – was a medical exemption.

Two daughters of a New York podiatrist told The New York Times recently that 50 years ago, their father diagnosed Trump with bone spurs in his heels, as a favor to the doctor’s landlord, millionaire real estate developer Fred Trump.

SANDERS RIPS BIDEN FOR SWANKY FUNDRAISERS, ACCUSES HIM OF COURTING ELITE

On the campaign trail in 2015, as he was running for president, Trump said: “It was a long time ago … I had student deferments and then ultimately had a medical deferment because of my feet. I had a bone spur.”

Trump told reporters at the time that he couldn’t remember which foot had the problem. His campaign later said the bone spurs affected both feet.

Minutes after once again charging that Trump used his “privilege” to avoid military service, Buttigieg emphasized to the audience that “we can’t spend all our time thinking up a zinger that’s going to knock the president flat. Because any energy that goes his way, any attention that goes his way, even in the form of criticism, it’s kind of like food, he just takes it in and gets bigger off of it.”

Asked later by Fox News how he could square those comments with his repeated attacks on Trump the past two days over his Vietnam War deferments, the candidate answered “we absolutely need to say exactly what we think about the president’s wrongdoing, malfeasance and lies. It’s just that that can’t be our message. As soon as we say that, we’ve got to return to the question of how we’re going to make American lives better.”

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Buttigieg also appeared to take a shot at the former vice president during the town hall. In an obvious reference to Biden – who many voters feel may be the most electable candidate of the two-dozen Democrats currently running for president, Buttigieg argued that “sometimes we pick somebody who is less inspiring that we think will also be less risky and we wind up getting somebody that’s neither.”

“The point is you can move people. It’s not just about ideology. It’s not just about where your dot is on the political spectrum. It is about offering something new, offering something different,” the 37-year old candidate emphasized.

Asked by a member of the crowd why they should support him, Buttigieg declared “two reasons, I’m going to make a really good president and I’m going to win.”

Source: Fox News Politics

President Trump and first lady Melania Trump landed in Japan on Saturday, kicking off a highly anticipated state visit — with the president to become the first foreign leader to meet Japan’s new Emperor Naruhito.

The trip, which will last through Tuesday, comes amid fears among Japanese political and business leaders that U.S. tariffs on the auto industry will have a crippling effect on the Asian nation’s economy.

The president’s first stop was a dinner with business leaders at the U.S. ambassador’s residence in Tokyo after a brief airport welcome.

Trump told reporters that he’s working to introduce “fairness and reciprocity” in the new American-Japanese trade agreement.

“Japan has had a substantial edge for many, many years but that’s OK,” Trump said during remarks with the business leaders in Tokyo, noting that negotiators were “hard at work” on the trade talks. “We’ll get it a little bit more fair.”

“Japan has had a substantial edge for many, many years but that’s ok. We’ll get it a little bit more fair.”

— President Trump

He added that the new trade deal will “address the trade imbalance” and eliminate the existing “barriers to U.S. exports.”

Japan enjoys a $70 billion trade surplus with the U.S, while it imports just a fraction of U.S. goods and imposes protective measures against competition from other countries, a source of frustration for Trump, who sees tariffs as a corrective measure.

President Donald Trump speaks as he meets with Japanese business leaders, Saturday, in Tokyo. (Associated Press)

President Donald Trump speaks as he meets with Japanese business leaders, Saturday, in Tokyo. (Associated Press)

TRUMP CHEERS US TROOPS DURING STOP IN ALASKA ON WAY TO MEET JAPAN’S NEW EMPEROR

Japan is expected to use the state visit as a charm offensive to convince Trump to spare the country of the punitive tariffs.

To fulfill this task, Trump is officially the first foreign leader invited to meet with the country’s new Emperor Naruhito, who inherited the throne earlier this month, a fact Trump gleefully acknowledged earlier this week. The emperor will treat Trump to a meeting and host an imperial banquet in Trump’s honor.

“Prime Minister [Shinzo] Abe said to me, very specifically, ‘You are the guest of honor.’ There’s only one guest of honor … I’m the guest of honor at the biggest event that they’ve had in over 200 years,” Trump said this week.

“So it’s a great thing. And we get along very well with Japan. I get along very well with the prime minister.”

U.S. President Donald Trump, right, and first lady Melania Trump arrive at the Haneda International Airport Saturday, May 25, 2019, in Tokyo. (Associated Press)

U.S. President Donald Trump, right, and first lady Melania Trump arrive at the Haneda International Airport Saturday, May 25, 2019, in Tokyo. (Associated Press)

During the first remarks in Japan, Trump also stressed that Japan is buying military equipment from the U.S., which he says was a sign of threats in the world.

“We make the best equipment in the world — the best jets, missiles, the best rockets, the best everything,” he said. “So Japan is doing very large orders and we appreciate that.”

“It’s probably appropriate for everything going on,” he added. “The world is changing.”

JAPAN’S TRADE NEGOTIATOR: US WON’T IMPOSE QUOTAS ON AUTOS

U.S. President Donald Trump, right, is greeted by Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono, left, on Trump's arrival at the Haneda International Airport Saturday, May 25, 2019, in Tokyo. (Associated Press)

U.S. President Donald Trump, right, is greeted by Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono, left, on Trump’s arrival at the Haneda International Airport Saturday, May 25, 2019, in Tokyo. (Associated Press)

On Sunday, Trump and Abe are expected to play golf and then watch a sumo wrestling tournament in front-row seats. Trump previously called the sport “fascinating.”

Only on Monday will the two leaders sit down to talk about trade. A possibility of a trade deal is reportedly on the table, but officials on neither side committed to such goal. (Because of the Japan trip, Trump paid a pre-Memorial Day visit to Arlington National Cemetery on Thursday, to honor America’s war dead.)

The U.S. and Japanese leaders will also discuss the threat from North Korea, an issue that comes in the wake of U.S. national security adviser John Bolton’s comments on Friday that a series of short-range missile tests by North Korea last month was a violation of U.N. Security Council resolutions.

U.S. President Donald Trump, second from left, reviews an honor guard during a welcome ceremony, escorted by Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at Akasaka Palace in Tokyo, Nov. 6, 2017. (Associated Press)

U.S. President Donald Trump, second from left, reviews an honor guard during a welcome ceremony, escorted by Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at Akasaka Palace in Tokyo, Nov. 6, 2017. (Associated Press)

But it remains to be seen whether the celebrations and close relationship between Trump and Abe will be enough to force Washington to reconsider imposing tariffs on Japanese auto exports.

The Trump administration is currently embroiled in a trade war against China over the country’s treatment of American companies.

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Yet the administration has been tough and criticized both Japan and the European Union for, in its view, unfair trade practices that exploit the U.S. economy.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Rep. Jackie Speier, D-Calif, invoked the 25th Amendment while weighing in on the bitter feud between President Trump and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi during an appearance Friday on MSNBC.

When asked if she agreed with Pelosi that there’s “concern” about the president’s mental fitness, Speier not only agreed; she said she believes Trump should have been removed from office long ago.

HOUSE DEM SPEAKS ABOUT HER OWN ABORTION: GOVERNMENT HAS ‘NO RIGHT IN MY UTERUS’

“I have felt for some time that the mental stability of the president of the United States is in question,” Speier said. “And I suggested invoking the 25th Amendment way back when, when he was calling the leader of North Korea ‘Rocket Man,’ and trying to gin up a war with North Korea. And I think that what we have here is someone who is obsessed.”

The congresswoman went on to echo psychiatrists who’ve diagnosed Trump “from afar” and determined he is a “malignant narcissist,” which she said involves “anti-social behavior, paranoia, and sadism.”

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After she urged everyone to “put the name-calling aside,” Speier went on to call the president a “petulant child.”

“Nancy Pelosi is a mother of five and the grandmother of many more. She knows how to deal with petulant children,” Speier added.

Source: Fox News Politics

President Trump greeted military personnel in Alaska during a refueling stop on Friday while on his way to Japan for a state visit.

Trump talked with American troops on the tarmac at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, posed for photos and signed caps.

“Nice stop,” he was heard saying while walking across the tarmac.

TRUMP’S JAPAN VISIT TO FOCUS ON PERSONAL TIES, NOT SUBSTANCE

“We’re here in Alaska, we’re on our way to Japan, we’re with our great military. These are great, great future leaders, right?” Trump said in a video posted on Twitter.

“We just got off the plane, I wanted to say hello, and these are tremendous people,” he continued, pointing at the troops. “So thank you very much.”

Trump also met with Gov. Mike Dunleavy during the stop, discussing issues concerning Alaska such regulations affecting Alaska economy.

Trump was set to arrive in Japan on Saturday evening local time, with the president being the first foreign leader to meet Japan’s new emperor, Naruhito.

TRUMP PAYS RESPECT TO MILITARY DEAD AT ARLINGTON AHEAD OF MEMORIAL DAY

President Donald Trump greets troops after landing at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson for a refueling stop en route to Japan Friday, May 24, 2019, in Anchorage. (Associated Press)

President Donald Trump greets troops after landing at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson for a refueling stop en route to Japan Friday, May 24, 2019, in Anchorage. (Associated Press)

The latest charm offensive from Japan comes amid fears among Japanese leaders that the potential U.S. tariffs on cars could be devastating to the economy.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe likely to use his close relationship with Trump to make sure his country is spared of the tariffs.

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To make that happen, the organizers of the state visit will show Trump the country’s traditions, including meeting the emperor and attending sumo wrestling matches.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

A proposal to pay every American adult $1,000 per month is an opportunity to “put economic resources directly into” the taxpayers’ hands, Andrew Yang said.

Yang, a 2020 Democratic presidential candidate, told Laura Ingraham on “The Ingraham Angle” his plan would also be an incentive for cities to “invest in people who are struggling with substance abuse or homelessness.”

He claimed his proposal, dubbed the “Freedom Dividend,” would help fix problems faced by people who are struggling.

“It would create an economic path forward for many people who, right now, are struggling and don’t have access to, let’s say, treatment for substance abuse problems, or mental health issues,” Yang said.

2020 CANDIDATE ANDREW YANG DEFENDS $1,000 A MONTH PROGRAM, SLAMS DEMS FOR WANTING TO ABOLISH ELECTORAL COLLEGE

Yang claimed he’s traveled around the country and heard from voters who feel they are not “connected” to some of the positive results happening in the U.S. economy.

“The experience I’m having when I talk to voters around the country is that 70 percent of them are living paycheck to paycheck. Fifty-seven percent can’t afford an unexpected $500 bill,” he claimed.

“The experience I’m having when I talk to voters around the country is that 70 percent of them are living paycheck to paycheck. Fifty-seven percent can’t afford an unexpected $500 bill.”

— Andrew Yang, a 2020 Democratic presidential candidate

Yang, 44, described the current economy as “winner-take-all” and said that in urban areas, poor and wealthy are living “next to each other in different circumstances.”

“We need to wake up to the fact that we’re in the midst of the greatest economic transformation in our country’s history, and start moving in the direction of just putting economic resources directly into our hands.”

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In a previous Fox News interview, Yang criticized the Trump administration’s tax cut, saying it benefits the wrong people.

“There is a lot of population that is struggling in the economy that has been charged up somewhat by a tax cut — most of which the benefits went to shareholders and stockholders instead of workers,” he said.

Fox News’ Victor Garcia contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

National Security Adviser John Bolton on Saturday said that there is “no doubt” that recent short-range missile launches by North Korea are in violation of U.N. Security Council resolutions — suggesting that the White House may be looking at putting a sharper edge on their diplomatic relations with dictatorship.

“U.N. Security Council resolutions prohibit North Korea from firing any ballistic missiles,” Bolton told reporters in Tokyo. “In terms of violating U.N. Security Council resolutions, there is no doubt about that.”

IRANIAN PRESIDENTIAL AIDE SAYS TRUMP WILL ‘GET A WAR’ FOR LISTENING TO ‘THE MUSTACHE’ JOHN BOLTON

The former U.S. ambassador to the U.N. made the remarks ahead of President Trump’s four-day visit to Japan, and said Trump would talk with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe about “making sure the integrity of the Security Council resolutions are maintained.”

North Korea’s tests earlier this month were the first launches since 2017 and are seen as a way to pressure the U.S. to compromise on its demands for North Korea to denuclearize.

The launches stopped in 2017 after an escalation in rhetoric from President Trump, who warned of “fire and fury” if North Korea kept up its aggression, and a slew of U.N. Security Council resolutions that imposed a broad range of sanctions on the country’s exports from from coal to seafood.

That in turn led to historic meetings between North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un and President Trump. The two leaders met in 2018 and earlier this year, but that relationship appears to have broken down since then.

The North requested sanctions relief in exchange for partial denuclearization measures. The U.S. balked at the request, insisting sanctions would not be relaxed until complete denuclearization.

Bolton’s remarks are in contrast in tone to President Trump’s reaction to the launches. Trump tweeted this month Kim “knows that I am with him & does not want to break his promise to me.”

TRUMP SAYS KIM JONG UN ‘KNOWS THAT I AM WITH HIM’ DESPITE LATEST NORTH KOREA TEST

“Deal will happen!” he said.

Bolton on Saturday told reporters that the administration’s position on denuclearization is consistent and described as “appropriate” the recent seizure of a North Korean cargo ship that was involved in banned coal exports. He added that the U.S. is prepared to resume talks at any point, saying that Special Representative Stephen Biegun is ready “to get on a plane and go anywhere.”

But Pyongyang on Friday said that negotiations won’t resume until Washington abandons its disarmament demands, and accused the U.S. of making impossible demands and therefore deliberately sabotaging the talks.

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Bolton on Saturday said that he takes “much of what they say with a grain of salt” and suggested the two sides discuss the return of a U.S. naval intelligence ship held by the North Koreans since the 1960s.

Bolton also said he backs a summit between Kim and Abe, who has recently said he is willing to hold a summit with Kim without preconditions — having previously said he would not do so without clear steps from the North Koreans to denuclearize.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Democrats‘ continued subpoenas for documents and witnesses pertaining to the Trump administration are a way to “inflame their base,” according to a Republican lawmaker.

Rep. Andy Biggs, R-Ariz., claimed on “Hannity” that Democrats are trying to energize their voting base with their investigations into President Trump.

Guest host Jason Chaffetz asked why Democrats would call witnesses who “can’t attend” and would subpoena documents “they know can’t be released.”

PELOSI URGES TRUMP AIDES, FAMILY TO STAGE AN ‘INTERVENTION’ FOR THE ‘GOOD OF THE COUNTRY’

“They are trying to inflame their base. You served on the [Judiciary] committee with me, so you know how some of the people are who we faced on a regular basis,” Biggs claimed.

“They are trying to conduct an impeachment investigation without getting to impeachment,” he added. “The Democrats are ready to rock and roll.”

Biggs claimed House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is doing everything in her power to “pull back on the horses” and keep her caucus “in check” on impeachment.

“I don’t think she can hold them back much longer,” he said.

Biggs charged that Pelosi “put gas on the fire” by accusing Trump of a “cover-up.”

“Those are the key phrases of the Nixon impeachment and Bill Clinton’s impeachment. She has to be so careful.”

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On Thursday, Pelosi criticized Trump’s alleged behavior at a White House meeting on infrastructure that was cut short.

“The president stormed out, pounded the table, walked out the door,” Pelosi told reporters. “Another temper tantrum, again, I pray for the president of the United States. I wish that his family, the administration, and his staff would have an intervention for the good of the country.”

Source: Fox News Politics


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